How to get (super) dewy, wet-looking skin with affordable make-up…

imageThis isn’t how to get dewy skin, but this is another level of dewy, another level of shine, almost wet-looking skin, so be prepared! I used all drugstore products to achieve this look, except for the foundation (but you can use any products that you like!)

1. Make sure you’ve exfoliated your skin to get rid of any dead skin cells, and you’ve moisturised your face, to ensure the make-up goes on smoothly. I also sprayed rose water on my face to add more glow.
2. A dewy skin look can really highlight a rough skin surface, blemishes, pores, that are not even visible without make-up. So after proper skin-care, you can use a smoothing, pore-minimising primer on certain areas of your face. On the rest of your face, you can apply an illuminating primer. Colour-correct and conceal blemishes if you want to. Continue reading

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Why do all women look like each other?!

Madison Stubbington for Gucci, a twist to the typical ‘trendy’ make-up…

Social media, trends, whatever, are all portraying the typical woman with big lashes, chiselled cheekbones, a defined jawline, a thin contoured nose, bronzed, flawless skin, big full lips that this ‘particular’ celebrity induced, etc… Contouring with make-up has been like an order ‘this is how you do it, this is how you should look like’ and there’s nothing wrong with that, if you’re comfortable with yourself looking like that, that’s fine. But it’s about finding what works best for you, not for the mass. I was doing my friend’s make-up the other day and what stood up for me was when she said ‘you didn’t try to change my facial features’. I myself love big lashes, bronzer, but I feel uncomfortable when I follow these trends, why do I want to be like the rest for? I started researching Korean, Japanese, Parisian, African trends, etc. for a possibly different twist on the typical picture in social media. The best advice I would give to anyone is to spend time in front of the mirror, experiment, and be creative with what works best for you. Do more leading than following, find your own style. Study yourself. What ever is on trend, try doing the opposite, try to invert the traditional methods of how things are done. Find out how to contour your own face shape, your own eye shape, through trial and error, pick what makes you feel comfortable in your own eyes. Who says you can’t wear a strong, bright lip with a strong eye?! Same thing for how you dress, your hair, your body, study yourself and be comfortable in yourself, there’s no feature that you have to hide for the eyes of society, and there’s no feature that you have to show. It’s your own identity, not anyone else’s. I was walking by a jewellery store the other day and I was happy to see model Madison Stubbington for Gucci without heavy contouring, eye lashes, big overdrawn lips, not that there’s anything wrong with that, but it’s taking a different direction to the ‘norm’. Smile, you’re a beautiful soul (and spend time with yourself in the mirror)! ♥ ;D

What are you really putting on your skin?

1374It is important to realise what ingredients are contained in the cosmetics we use everyday. People usually assume that if a product is on sale at a supermarket or a drug store, it must be safe. However,  The Food and Drug Administration agency does not review or approve the vast majority of products or ingredients before they go on the market. Also, products labelled as “hypoallergenic” or “Natural”, can “mean anything or nothing at all,” according to the FDA.

I would recommend to visit www.ewg.org/skindeep/ which is the Environmental Working Group’s cosmetic database. You can search thousands of products to see how safe/dangerous they are from a rating of 1-10 and to also see what effects they have on the human body. If a product you are looking for is unavailable, you can simply ‘Build Your Own Report’ on the top left hand side of the screen. On the website you can also find a user’s guide, myths on cosmetic safety and shopping tips.

Some people would think that a lot of things we consume like over-processed foods or things we do in our everyday lives such as spending hours on mobile phones can cause harm, so why should we care about the cosmetics we use? Firstly, what goes onto your skin enters your body, just like what you put in your mouth enters your body and sources say that our skin absorbs 60% of the products we use. Secondly, further research into the topic of what are the actual ingredients involved will surprise you. Here are just some:

  • Placenta: Human and animal placenta help to condition hair and skin
  • Crushed Beetles: Used commonly in red lipstick and blusher. According to The New York Times, when they are full of cactus juice, the insects are boiled, dried out and crushed.
  • Infant foreskin: Full of antioxidants, natural growth factors and proteins, it is often used in anti-ageing products.
  • Whale vomit:  Often used in perfumes, and apparently present in Chanel perfumes
  • Dynamite is found in exfoliators, natural toothpastes, deodorants and powders
  • Bull semen is used in some European salons to condition hair
  • Rust:  Used for the colour pink in make-up
  • Wool wax: Produces lanolin which provides protection against chapped skin, and provides moisture
  • Fish scales: Gives shimmer and sheen to the product.
  • Chicken bone-marrow: Used in moisturisers for its anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Decaying animal fat by boiling animal carcasses to help in the production of  lipsticks, eye shadows and soaps.

It’s not just the ingredients that are used in products, it’s the lack of information contained on the label. I want to know what is in my products, choosing to use it or not is another choice.

Sources and useful websites: 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/skarlan/13-surprising-and-gross-cosmetic-ingredients

http://www.totalbeauty.com/content/gallery/gross-ingredients-in-beauty-products

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-4188/Chemicals-in-Your-Beauty-Products-Infographic.html